As students applied and renewed their organizations  in January, they faced a newly implemented policy to have at least 10 students on their roster at the time of registration. The policy serves to maintain healthy student organizations.

“We had a number of organizations who were around two to three people and that’s not really an organization. Two or three students that have a common interest, that’s great and they can be friends and enjoy that, but the thought was they probably aren’t getting the most out of our resources, nor do they need our resources to do what they are doing and have a common interest,” said Becka Bovio, coordinator for student programs.

Ten student organizations registered in January with fewer than 10 members, serving as examples of how  the rule can be broken.

“There are definitely exceptions: if there is an organization that clearly uses our resources, and is really active and engaged in the campus and community, of course we aren’t going to say no just because you don’t have 10 members,” Bovio said. “We want those smaller organizations to continue to thrive and use our resources.”

Around 18 fewer student organizations registered this year. Bovio thinks some of that has to do with the new policy and member requirement—but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

The Student Involvement Office exists as a resource for student organizations and Bovio wants to ensure all clubs are making the best use of those resources and actively participating in the Trinity community rather than just skating by.

“We understand that the number of students in an organization is in flux, but if they have some semblance of a following it just makes for a healthier organization. This wasn’t meant to be a punishment or random requirement, but it is meant to be for the health of an organization,” Bovio said.

Bovio made it clear to all student organizations facing retirement due to the new policy that they could talk to her and figure out a solution to recruit students more effectively.