Thanks to the efforts of sophomore Weiyu Lin, Trinity students now have the opportunity to become a part of the Club of Mind, a program designed to allow students to inspire each other and brainstorm new and creative ideas.

Lin, who goes by his English name “Will,” first came up with the idea for the club after learning helpful tips for improving the memory.

“I shared them with my friends, but the chances were only limited to, for example, the dining hall table and my Chinese tutor job,” Lin said. “The Club of Mind is a bigger stage to have my ideas shared to more students.”

The club plans to meet once or twice a week in the Parker Chapel Meditation Room. Meetings are currently expected to last about half an hour, depending on the number of ideas shared.

“The time we meet is very little, but every minute is loaded with helpful information,” Lin said.

Meditation as a way to come up with innovative ideas is also something the club will focus on. Lin recently experienced the benefits and also the difficulties that come with meditation personally.

“I managed to meditate every day since one year ago. I wished to share my personal experience to break people’s stereotype on meditation and hopefully let them start it,” Lin said.

Lin held the Club of Mind’s first official meeting on Thursday, Sept. 12, and about seven other students attended. The main idea discussed during the meeting was, “Why you cannot change your life no matter how many books you read and ideas you heard.”

Laura Prentice, a senior majoring in environmental studies, was one of the students who attended the first meeting. She described the first meeting as “a peaceful environment.”

“I wanted to join initially because Will is a really interesting person who has a lot to share,” Prentice said. “At the first meeting, he shared the idea that feelings are much more powerful than actual words in conveying wisdom.”

Nikita Viswasam, a junior majoring in neuroscience, also enjoyed the Club of Mind’s first meeting.

“I thought that hearing student-created content with no topic limit would be a great opportunity, especially from the bright minds of this campus. [Lin’s] talk was so well thought-out that I couldn’t help but enjoy it,” Viswasam said.

She also believes the idea-sharing mentality of the club could be very beneficial.

“Who knows? Maybe there’s someone in that audience that walks away with a different view of the world because of your ideas,” Viswasam said.

Lin expects the club to hold future events such as, “how to improve your eyesight naturally,” “the healing power of breath,” “how to improve your memory” and even, “how many days can you survive without Facebook.” However, he expects the club’s events to depend mainly on the interests and needs of its members.

“We are the loyal patron to any creative idea,” Lin said.

Students interested in joining the club or getting on the email list should contact Lin at wlin@trinity.edu.