I am writing this as I watch “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.” The amount of time that humans have been in this universe of ours is staggeringly small. If you imagine a calendar where January 1 represents the Big Bang and December 31 represents this present moment, humans have only been around since the last hour of the last day.

As a species, we are nothing. We are utterly inconsequential to the universe, yet we have managed into leave our tiny planet to venture to the wide expanse of space. The innovation and ingenuity of our race continues with the iPhone 6. Now it has a bigger screen.

Apple’s recent unveiling and my snide remark aside, the computing revolution that started decades ago is likely to continue. Moore’s Law may be reaching its end, but humans keep finding new ways to circumvent the slowdown of faster processors.

Instead of doubling processing power in 18 months, we now have multi-core processors and cloud computing.

To me, the diversification and proliferation of computing devices makes the inevitable slowdown of processor development a moot point for average consumers. Computers are phones, watches, cars, robots, drones, glasses, smoke detectors and anything else that can hold a computer chip.

Enough of my doe-eyed ponderings about computers and technology; on to the meaty parts of consumerism.

The iPhone 6, Apple’s second-worst-kept secret, was recently announced at an event, and everyone was talking about the phone or making jokes (about the size, of course).

Granted, Apple is, aside from Google, the most loved (and hated)  company in America—maybe the world—so it makes sense that people would be talking about their new announcements. I might mock that, but this article is just another example, so mocking it would really make me a big fat hypocrite.

No one will stop talking about the new phone, and frankly, I do not understand it. I think it was a natural progression for the iPhone—bigger, faster, stronger—but more importantly, every other phone manufacturer has already been doing all of those things.

Overall, I am very underwhelmed by the new iPhone, though my disappointment will not deter the multi-million-dollar rush of people pre-ordering the phone (numbering at around 4 million today according to Apple). If you want an iPhone with a bigger, tougher screen  and a slightly faster processor, then the iPhone 6 is for you.

In short, it is a decent iteration of a frequently updated product, but that’s about it.

In addition to the new iPhone, a bunch of new, innovative watches have also hit the market in recent days. They are worth examining as well.

The Pebble Smartwatch, was funded via Kickstarter. Since most people had never heard of this smart watch, it came as a surprise;think of it as the “Beyonce” of smartwatches.

In the last month, a steady stream of watches doubling as wearable computers has flooded the market, inciting incessant buzzing in the blogosphere of technology. Samsung and LG have been pioneers in this field, and are some of the first manufacturers to make Android watches.

You probably still remember those old watches that had calculator buttons on the watch face. Well, this Smartwatch is a tiny bit more complicated than that. And, in this writer’s hubmble opinion, more than a tiny bit better.

These watches are powered by a version of Google’s Android OS (what’s inside the HTC One, Samsung Galaxy models, etc.), and they connect to your phone so they can receive notifications, send messages and emails, make calls, search Google and provide calendar reminders.

Imagine listening to music on this device. Instead of having to take your phone out of your pocket, you could just use the controls on your watch. If you’re looking for a product to enable your laziness, this is certainly a good one.

This device has major potential. As with the original iPhone—you know, the one that blew up the mobile computer world—developers will be able to create apps either for the watch or as companions to their phone apps.

In other news, Apple has  publically announced their worst-kept secret: the Apple Watch.

The watch functions very similarly to its Android counterparts, though it also has a cool digital crown that lets you interact with the device without covering the screen.

In other words, is basically an iPhone and a watch smashed into a smaller unit on your wrist.

As expected, Apple’s watch (or Apple Watch) looks amazing: the wristband looks modest and the face looks exquisite.  This kind of sleekness would make Steve Jobs proud.

This watch and Apple Pay (which lets you use your phone and watch to pay at credit card terminals) are far more interesting and exciting than the iPhone 6.

Wearable computing may seem like a weird concept to some, but I think the technology and demand are here to stay.

In fact, I see wearable computers becoming a part of everyday life, just like our smartphones. Before long, they will be ubiquitous.

With all of our technology changing so fast and so frequently, our cosmos should stay very interesting.