Author: Gabriel Levine

My time among the Deplorables

“You could put half of Trump’s supporters into what I call the basket of deplorables. Right? The racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic — you name it.” These words, uttered by Hillary Clinton at a fundraiser on Sept. 9, 2016, are some of the most infamous of the 2016 campaign. They sparked an immediate backlash and the term “deplorable” was proudly adopted by Trump and his supporters as a badge of pride and a rallying cry. In the aftermath of the election, Trump and his deplorables having won the presidency, a Facebook group called Pantsuit Nation rapidly and organically grew...

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Civil society is true survivalism

The world feels unstable. Domestically, political and social divisions are at a higher pitch than ever in my living memory and perhaps since the tumultuous years of the 1960s. I’ve felt a distinct loss of political control as social retrogrades, cultural revanchists and scientific ignoramuses gain ground in legislatures around the country. Simultaneously, there is the broadly covered civil unrest in the United States and worse situations abroad, such as far-right parties coming to power throughout Europe and the worrying specter of repressive countries like Russia and China asserting their power. Observing all this, I’ve become distinctly aware of...

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Counterpoint: DIY or buy? Buy!

Halloween is approaching once again, and with it comes the spooky, terrifying dilemma: Should you buy a costume or make your own? For creative types, especially those who own a wide variety of strange clothing already, making your own costume is probably a great, fun idea. However, for everyone else, buying a costume works just fine. Now, it’s almost certainly true that a self-made costume will look better and have the added sheen of originality, as compared to a store-bought costume. However, a self-made costume requires several crucial components that most students don’t have. First: time. It’s a not...

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Shortchanged by “Theatre for Social Change”

In last week’s issue of the Trinitonian, Arts & Entertainment writer Austin Davidson wrote a glowing review of “Theatre for Social Change: On Domestic Abuse.” Last Friday, I saw the show for myself and, though I agree with Austin on some points, there were some very disappointing aspects of the show. The production focused on two separate, real stories of domestic abuse. For each, an actor first read a transcript of an interview to establish background and then several actors re-enacted a specific scene of abuse. Next, the scene was repeated with opportunities for audience members to swap themselves...

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Absorbing experience, modern distraction

In his book “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind,” acclaimed Israeli historian Yuval Noah Harari asserts that the agricultural revolution didn’t so much give humans mastery of plants as much as those plants gained mastery over humans. The process of cultivating corn, for example, required continual effort from human workers, while all the corn had to do was grow. In a certain sense, the current technological revolution has created a similar problem. Consider our omnipresent smartphones. As amazing as they are, they require constant attention to their battery life. That little percentage is the first thing I check before...

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