Author: Davis Mathis

Trinity math professors devise new ranking model

Two Trinity math professors have introduced a highly sophisticated and mathematical method to create the most accurate possible ranking system for sports. Eduardo Balreira and Brian Miceli are the primary professors working on this ranking method, and so far, they have mostly used it to predict sports. This method allowed them to correctly predict the NBA Western Conference finals last year, which earned them a television appearance to predict the finals—and they were correct again. Balreira described some of the logic behind the system on which they based their ranking method. “The idea is that when you beat a team, you have now shown that you are better than them, so you put a link from the loser team to the winner as if the winner were gaining the importance of the loser team,” Balreira said. This  concept is already established as a mathematical idea, but when applied to sports, Balreira notes it contains a flaw. When a team upsets the already-established top team in this method, they become the best team despite how poor their previous performances were. Miceli expanded on what makes their system different from other ranking models. “What you want is a way to measure how good a team is. The classic way is you just look at their records…but what this does is maybe those wins didn’t come against good teams. So let’s look...

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Trinity participates in National Campus Safety Awareness Month

In order to avoid harm, people must know the potential dangers facing them. Educating people on these dangers is the purpose of Trinity’s participation in National Campus Safety Awareness Month, in which hundreds of campuses participate. Campus safety carries a broad definition and includes sexual assault, drugs, alcohol, theft and many other potentially dangerous campus situations. The Trinity University Police Department (TUPD) has been running weekly events for the month and educating students on ways to stay safe on campus. For example, they provided a bike registration night for students to register their bikes for tracking in the event of a theft. According to TUPD, three bike thieves were caught last semester thanks to the registration program. Officer Pete Morales spoke on the overall importance of this month. “We’ll do one event a week, and within these weeks we’ll have a ton of information on alcohol, drugs, sexual assault and everything that can possibly affect a student on campus, and we have actual resources for students, because campus safety is everything from a fire to an active shooter and more,” Morales said. The overarching theme of the month is to educate students on the best ways  to help themselves in potentially dangerous situations. Senior Rivers Wallace applauds the efforts of TUPD to keep students safe. “I do think being informed is at least a part of the battle. It...

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Tigers for Tigers looks to expand in its second year

New organizations often experience growing periods while they try to find their feet. Tigers for Tigers is looking to speed that process up as much as possible as it enters its second year on campus. The group, which is dedicated to raising awareness of the fact that tigers are quickly becoming extinct, is part of a national organization made up of schools with the tiger for a mascot. Tigers are officially an endangered species, and senior Alyssa Fink,  president of the Trinity chapter, notes that they seem to be rapidly approaching extinction. “Tigers will go extinct if we do not do something about it. One crazy tiger fact I love to throw out is that there are more in captivity in Texas than there are left in the wild,” Fink said. Tigers for Tigers plans to expand more this year after spending its first year handling the logistics of becoming an organization. Junior Tito Sandigo is confident that their message will attract more students as it did him. “Once I found out more, after reading some pamphlets from our national coordinator, I was astounded that there’s so few in the wild right now. I didn’t know that they were so endangered,” Sandigo said. “I didn’t know that white tigers are not a good thing because they’re inbred.” The group has spent much of its time devising ways to make...

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Tyga concert disappoints some students

The Welcome Week concert this year received a lot of attention when the appearance of hit artist Tyga was announced. He is relatively famous, with hits such as “Molly,” “Rack City” and “Make it Nasty,” and he is featured on many other hits with his labelmates on Young Money records. When the time came for him to perform at Trinity, however, many people were not happy with the performance. Sophomore Nate Kizla, who attended the show, spoke on how he felt about the concert. “He was something like thirty minutes late and then played for maybe another thirty. It wasn’t particularly good, to be honest,” Kizla said. This thought was echoed by other students as well; sophomore Anusha Bradley noted that she wasn’t the only one who was disappointed, since the whole group of people that came with her felt the same way, despite their initial excitement. “There were about ten of us that came together and he played for about thirty minutes and played maybe four songs that were actually his. All of us were kind of upset,” Bradley said. While the show did not last as long as some students would have liked, not all feedback was negative. Kizla conceded that the show was not considered entirely bad. “I mean, while he was on stage he was energetic and tried to engage the crowd. Not everyone was...

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Neurobiologist and primatologist Sapolsky speaks on being human

For centuries, people have attempted to answer one question: what are humans? MacArthur Genius Grant recipient and Stanford professor Robert Sapolsky spoke at Trinity with his own answers to that question. Sapolsky is a primatologist and neurologist who studies groups of baboons and levels of stress. His visit to Trinity was part of the Distinguished Scientist Lecture Series, which brings in prominent scientists to discuss their work and studies in the field and laboratory. In his lecture at Trinity, he discussed three aspects of humans and what makes them different. First, he described characteristics that are exactly the same...

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